The University of Sheffield
Management School

Management School News

Archive for the ‘Honorary’ Category

An extraordinary achievement – Dr Angela Carter awarded Lifetime Achievement Award

Thursday, June 8th, 2017

IMG_5529-new

Angie Carter is not your average academic.

Her untraditional route to the top is a story of passion, tenacity and patience which has recently been acknowledged with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology (EAWOP).

As a long-standing member of the Institute of Work Psychology at the Management School, Angie’s career has been underpinned by a drive to develop learning in others. She said: “It’s a passion of mine to apply learning to practice. I’ve decided that the biggest success I’ve had isn’t just imparting learning to other people – it’s encouraging others to do so. Some of the people I have supervised (practitioners and PhD scholars) are supervising others now, and that’s extraordinarily nice to hear.”

Angie’s first foray into teaching was at St Bartholomew’s Hospital in London – having trained in radiotherapy, she enjoyed developing people in a technical and a caring job. It was the 1980s and the hospital told her to ‘go out and get a degree’, which she embarked on part-time: “I really enjoyed the part of my work that was about communication with people – I’d been teaching ultrasonographers how to talk to their patients, so psychology appeared to be the most obvious thing for me to do.

“I caught the bug and knew I wanted to do more research after that.”

Her legacy in London continues, as she was one of the team who established a regional school of radiography which still exists in Charterhouse Square.

Redundancy from her job in the health service was a catalyst for change: “I started teaching leadership and management in the early 1990s. Twenty-plus years later, I’m still teaching leadership and management! So it’s interesting how things go around.

“Redundancy was a real schism in my career that took me into further study. I had an opportunity to do what I wanted to do – I met people from the Institute of Work Psychology and came up to Sheffield to apply for a research assistant role looking at the first big stress study in healthcare. Got that, and my PhD four years later. And here I still am!”

Volunteering for professional associations like EAWOP and the British Psychological Society (BPS) has shaped Angie’s career for decades. After time spent on the BPS’s international committee, she was invited to join EAWOP’s executive committee on which she spent six years, one of the driving factors behind this award: “I got to meet fantastic people but built an unhappy image of the continent. If you look at Europe from the Western side, we have strong educational pathways, well-formed practitioner-academic roles, and work psychology is buzzing. Go further East, and it’s much less so.  Not only is there more poverty, but there isn’t a defined academic core of study.

“They just don’t have the opportunities – academic salaries are so low that work psychologists have to practice, so they don’t have time to do much research. There’s a flattening of ability, and as I met people there through EAWOP, we formed a group called the Baltic Alliance. I brought them together, enabling better funding for educational and research projects. They all became EAWOP constituents and one of my roles in the executive committee was to expand these numbers – I started with about ten, and left with 34. I expanded the scope of EAWOP, and what it could achieve.”

Building constituents was just the beginning of Angie’s EAWOP journey. While developing these links across Europe, she was working with practitioner Ute Schmidt-Brasse to develop a practice-based journal for the association – they’re now into their ninth year of publishing In-Journal, and it goes from strength to strength. Angie also established the Worklab, an annual meeting for work psychology practitioners with a minimum of two years’ experience, which again aims to bridge the gap between research and practice.

Back in Sheffield, Angie contributes to the Management School’s Masters in Occupational Psychology and Work Psychology, running a module called Applying Psychology to Work and Organisations. The module is assessed by a portfolio based on ten elements of practice that make a good work psychologist. She said: “The portfolio makes the applied learning more real for students and prepares them for their future work roles.”

“There are a number of challenges facing graduates – my advice would be not to just chase ‘any job’ – pursue an area of work that you’re passionate about. Use every opportunity you can to network and make contacts – we offer extraordinary opportunities for students that may mean a little bit of work outside the general curriculum, but you’ll get noticed.”

Angie considers ‘getting real’ as a concern for work psychology as a whole, particular post-recession when organisations are still keeping a close eye on the bottom line: “What worries me is that a lot of areas of research are too narrow and don’t look at the big picture facing business now, which is how to get the best performance from employees so organisations can achieve their goals in tough times.

“I think there’s a reality check that needs to happen – we need to research the big important questions, rather than things companies don’t want to know about. They’re interested in engaging, but they need to see that engagement relate to performance.”

The study of organisations is shaping Angie’s research now. She’s looking at youth employment – why businesses choose not to employ young people, what they don’t understand about the 18 to 24-year old demographic, and what they’re missing out on: “There are two sides, and until we start researching the work side of employability, we won’t get an answer to the big questions of getting young people into good work roles.”

The Lifetime Achievement Award from EAWOP is a wonderful summary of Angie’s career – recognising her voluntary work and contribution to the lives of work psychologists around the world. The Management School is incredibly proud of her exceptional contribution.

Leading innovators in learning and teaching awarded by Senate

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

For the fourth year running, the Management School has achieved success in the University’s prestigious Senate Awards.

Prof Paul Latreille, Associate Dean for Learning and Teaching at the Management School, scooped the prestigious Senate Award for Leadership in Learning and Teaching. On his win, he said: “I’m delighted with this acknowledgement from the University. We’ve worked hard to become leading innovators in learning and teaching and to deliver an outstanding student experience, and it hasn’t just been my efforts: without an exceptional team of supportive academic and professional services colleagues, this award wouldn’t have been possible. I’m proud of the entire School and this award is a further reflection of our collegiality and the great things we can achieve together.”

Andrea Ward, University Teacher and Postgraduate Director for Teaching Quality and Enhancement, has been awarded the Early Career Senate Award. She was praised for being a dedicated, inspirational teacher and mentor who makes the most of available technology, saying: “My teaching approach is facilitative encouraging participation and to provoke thinking to enable them to reach their potential by helping them create the ability and skill to decipher real world situations. It’s an honour to have this acknowledged by the University.”

The final award, for Collaborative Activities, was a group presentation to the Global Leadership Initiative Team (GLOSS), including Management School academic staff Prof Jason Heyes and Dr Thomas Hastings. For the past two years Jason and Tom have arranged for groups of Sheffield students to attend meetings of the Governing Body of the International Labour Organisation, a specialist agency of the United Nations. Thanks to Jason and Tom’s efforts, the students have spent a week in Geneva meeting ILO officials and learning about the realities of international policy making. Their commitment to securing valuable international opportunities for students in the social sciences has made a significant difference to student experience across the Faculty.

Dean of the Management School, Prof David Oglethorpe, reflected on the announcement: “I couldn’t be prouder of our achievements in learning and teaching and some of these have been recognised formally by the University again this year with four Management School staff achieving Senate awards. This is the fourth year running that the Management School has members of staff receiving these awards – a true reflection of our commitment to ensuring excellent, innovative teaching provision for students.”

Click here to read more about the Senate Awards and winners across the university.

SUMS appoints Nestle vice president as visiting professor

Thursday, March 10th, 2016

Newly appointed visiting professor at the Management School and international supply chain expert, Chris Tyas, will present his annual lecture on 9 May.

Chris, who took on his visiting professor role in February, is Head of Global Supply Chain for Nestle SA, based at the company’s HQ in Vevey, Switzerland. He has recently been appointed as Senior Vice President of Nestle SA in addition to his Supply Chain role.

He was awarded a visiting professorship to acknowledge his ongoing work with the Management School, especially an annual visiting lecture to students on the MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management. In addition to his work with the school, Chris is a member of the Engagement Board of the Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures.

Head of External Relations at the Management School, Ian Proctor, said: “We’re incredibly proud to honour Chris with this role – his knowledge in the supply chain arena is of the highest calibre and he chooses to pass this on to our students on an annual basis.

“He has invited MBA and PhD students, as well as staff, to join this year’s lecture which is sure to be excellent.”

 

Chris Tyas’s lecture will take place on 9 May 2016, 12pm in Lecture Theatre 2 at the Management School.

Leading accounting Professor honoured

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

_MG_8980

Fourty-two leading social scientists have been conferred as Fellows of the Academy of Social Sciences, including Management School Chair in Accounting and Finance Professor Josephine Maltby.

Fellows are drawn from across the spectrum of academia, practitioners, and policymakers and have been recognised after a process of peer review for the excellence and impact of their work in the social sciences. This includes thought leadership based on innovative research, the application of evidence for policy, the adoption of social science insights in practice and sustained advocacy that has improved the public understanding of issues where social science can make a contribution in higher education, government, and everyday life.

Josephine has an international reputation for her work on women as savers and investors and in the history of the accounting profession. Recent pieces for The Conversation have investigated savings history and charity finances. She also maintains relations with businesses such as Ratesetter, a P2P lending company for whom later this week she will discuss women and investment on an invited panel – click here to read more about the event.

The Academy of Social Sciences is Britain’s national academy of academics, learned societies and practitioners representing nearly 90,000 social scientists.

A Pioneering Academic: Remembering Tony Lowe

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

_MG_8002  _MG_7894_MG_7939

We celebrated the life and contribution of the late Professor Tony Lowe at a series of events on 3 June.

Over 70 attendees came for a day of events at Sheffield University Management School organised by members of the Accounting and Financial Management (AFM) Division and the Centre for Research into Accounting and Finance in Context (CRAFiC).

Head of the AFM Division at Sheffield, Professor Bill Lee, said: “We were delighted to welcome guests from academic and practitioner backgrounds, as well as individuals who knew Tony personally. I was very honoured to welcome many of Tony’s family who helped us during the ceremony to rename the Lowe Lecture Theatre in the Management School.”

“Tony Lowe was the University of Sheffield’s first Professor of Accounting and Financial Management and led The Sheffield School of accounting research, so to see him honoured in the building was very important to us.”

The day began with the Early Career Researcher and PhD workshop and an introductory lecture from Professor Lisa Jack (Portsmouth) discussing social theory and accounting research. The workshop was co-organised with the BAFA Inter-Disciplinary Perspectives SIG and was supported by the Management Control Association. Attendees then split into groups of six to analyse how social theory can be applied to help understand current events. Bill Lee (Sheffield), Doris Merkl-Davies (Bangor), Robin Roslender (Dundee) and Lesley Catchpowle (Greenwich) led these groups.

Following lunch, there was a comprehensive feedback session and discussion on the morning’s events and the naming ceremony. Attendees then filled the Lowe Memorial Lecture Theatre ahead of a panel session discussing the relevance of The Sheffield School today.

Dean of the Management School, Professor David Oglethorpe, and Professor Bill Lee opened proceedings and introduced the panel which was facilitated by Professor John Cullen and comprised Emeritus Professor Richard Laughlin (Kings College, London), Professor Prem Sikka (Essex), Professor Christine Cooper (Strathclyde) and Professor Jane Broadbent (Royal Holloway).

The discussion was broad, but also introduced fascinating insights into Tony’s life and career. While Richard discussed The Sheffield School’s basic principles, Prem touched on how accounting academics can engage the political arena. Meanwhile, Christine profiled the effect of neoliberalism on society and higher education and Jane presented the history of the Management Control Association (MCA), which Tony had helped to found, and the need to revisit The Sheffield School’s original debates. A lively Q&A session followed.

As attendees retired for supper, Dr Stewart Smyth (co-director of CRAFiC) read tributes to Tony which we received from those who couldn’t attend. He concluded: “The day was a fitting tribute to a man who contributed so much to the School, and to the accounting and financial management as a whole. It was an honour to celebrate Tony’s legacy at Sheffield University Management School.”

 

Find out more about CRAFiC
Find out more about The Sheffield School and Prof Anthony Lowe

Significant Indian honour for SUMS academic

Tuesday, January 6th, 2015

MS100

Dr Niraj Kumar, Lecturer in Operations and Supply Chain Management and Programme Director for our BA International Business Management (pictured above), has been selected as a recipient of the prestigious ‘Hind Rattan Award 2015’ for his valuable contribution to academia and the society at large.

Hind Rattan (which translates to the ‘Jewel of India’) is one of the highest Indian diasporic honours, awarded annually to non-resident Indians (NRIs) by the NRI Welfare Society of India under the umbrella of the Government of India. Dr Kumar has been selected for this prestigious award for his research and initiatives that have raised the profile of India in international academic circles. Dr Kumar said: “It is a great honour to receive recognition for my efforts. I will endeavour to reciprocate the faith by keeping up the good work.”

Dr Kumar’s research interests broadly relate to sustainable supply chain management, supply networks and food supply chains. He has worked on a number of research projects with companies in the UK and Indian aerospace, retail, construction, food and automobile sectors. Currently he is involved in a research project called ‘Green Design to Green Disposal’, with the objective to design the green supply chain for the next generation. The project is funded by the UK-India Education and Research Initiative.

Apart from his academic contribution, Dr Kumar is actively involved in various educational outreach activities with schools in Jharkhand, with the objective to inform and encourage young students to adopt sustainable practices in their daily lives. He has received various awards in UK and India for his contribution to community services and social cause. He is also the Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in UK.

Dr Kumar is attending the award ceremony, which takes place on 25 January 2015 on the eve of the Republic Day in New Delhi.

Professor Cullen takes on Presidency of BAFA

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

JohnCullen

As of today (1 May), Professor John Cullen becomes President of the British Accounting and Finance Association (BAFA).

As the learned society for accounting and finance in the UK, the Association, which recently held its 50th annual conference at the London School of Economics, aims to advance knowledge and understanding of education and research in areas of accounting and finance, as well as promoting closer relations among academics, practitioners, policy makers and others who are interested in the development the sector. It plays an important role in representing the wider interests of accounting and finance in the Higher Education Sector and engages fully in consultations about policy issues and nomination of representatives for panels such as REF 2014.

Prof Cullen is excited about his two-year position as President, and he is determined to continue the excellent work undertaken by previous presidents in taking the learned society forward. He recognises that there are challenges ahead and realises that the role comes with a great deal of responsibility. He said: “We have a strong group of trustees, executive members, sub-committees and special interest groups and I am confident that we will be able to take BAFA further forward during the two years of my presidency and beyond.

“I am particularly keen to further embed the accounting and finance academic community, through BAFA, into the activities of the Academy of Social Sciences. I have been working on this relationship for the last couple of years and see the importance of accounting and finance as a discipline impacting on social science agendas. I see my time as President as the ideal time to engage further and build on this relationship.

“Accounting and Finance is the foundation for much business and management school education, and this highlights the importance of BAFA in a national and international context.”

BAFA is a very active organisation. Aside from the extremely popular annual conference, which this year welcomed 430 attendees from across the globe, and doctoral conference (120 attendees), it has a highly populated events calendar through the activities of the sub committees (Committee of Departments of Accounting and Finance [CDAF]; Conference of Professors of Accounting and Finance (CPAF) and the large number of special interest groups.

BAFA also publishes The British Accounting Review which is a top ranked academic journal in the field. Doctoral members are encouraged and subsidised, and BAFA is very well connected with a range of influential professional bodies such as CIMA, ICAEW, ACCA, CIPFA, CPA Australia, ICAS and CFA.

www.bafa.ac.uk

Sheffield University Management School alumni receive further honours

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

Graduation-PiazzaTwo of Sheffield University Management School’s alumni were conferred with their honorary degrees at the graduation ceremonies last week:

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe awarded LLD (Doctor of Laws)
Alumnus of the Executive MBA programme 1999, Sir Bernard received his honorary degree on behalf of the School of Law in recognition of his services to the Metropolitan Police. He took the position of Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police in September 2011 and was previously the Chief Constable of Merseyside Police.  Born in Sheffield, Sir Bernard began his career in the forces with South Yorkshire Police when he was 22 and also received his Knighthood early this year.

Simon Moran awarded DMus (Doctor of Music) in recognition of his achievements in the music industry
A Business Studies graduate of the Management School 1987, Simon Moran is the owner and managing director of SJM Concerts, one of the largest UK-based concert promotion companies. He produced his first live music events in the Students’ Union over 25 years ago and now works with such acts as Take That, The Stone Roses and Beyoncé. His company now operates over 2,000 shows per year.

You can see all of the most recent Honorary degree graduates at http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/news/nr/honorary-degrees-toni-minichiello-1.293003

International business links develop with prestigious events

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

Dr Emanuel Gomes, lecturer in strategy and international business at Sheffield University Management SchoolSheffield University Management School’s global reputation continues to grow, with a recent trip to Nigeria being a significant step forward in alumni relations and student recruitment.

However, this is not the first time our world-class academics and professional staff have endeavoured to build international bridges for the School’s ambitious students. Earlier in 2013, MSc Management (International Business) programme director and lecturer in strategy and international business Dr Emanuel Gomes (pictured left) invited Angolan Deputy Ambassador, Eduardo Sangueve, and Nigerian Senator Nurudeen A Usman to an organised event with this year’s cohort.

Students heard about the real economic potential of Angola and Nigeria and enjoyed a brief question and answer session with the visiting dignitaries following the talk.

Dr Gomes’ expertise were also drawn on by the Royal Institute of International Affairs, a world-leading source of independent analysis, informed debate and influential ideas based at Chatham House, London. He attended and spoke at a meeting entitled ‘Higher Education in Angola: the Importance of International Partnerships’, alongside a number of Angolan dignitaries.

A thorough collection of notes from the meeting can be viewed by following this link: http://www.chathamhouse.org/sites/default/files/public/Research/Africa/310113summary.pdf

Forgemasters’ chief shortlisted for entrepreneur of the year award

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Sheffield Forgemasters’ International’s chief executive, Dr Graham Honeyman, has been short-listed for accountants and business advisers Ernst & Young’s coveted Entrepreneur Of The Year Award.

Dr Honeyman is one of 10 Yorkshire entrepreneurs, vying with 32 others from across the North of England at the regional finals in Manchester in June.

He has received a series of business awards since he led Forgemasters’ successful fight for survival after its American parent group hit financial problems

After Kansas-based Atchison Casting Corporation filed for bankruptcy, Dr Honeyman kept its Sheffield arm operating, going on to head a management buy-out which protected employees’ pensions and laid the foundations for the historic company’s renaissance as a world leading producer of giant steel castings and forgings.

Just over two years ago, he was named winner of the inaugural Institute of Directors’ Director of the Year Award and its Global Director of the Year Award.

Earlier this year, Dr Honeyman was appointed an Honorary Professor in strategic management and Sheffield University Management School.

 

Article published in The Star 29/04/2013:  http://www.thestar.co.uk/news/business/forgemasters-chief-shortlisted-1-5624530