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Archive for the ‘lecture’ Category

A Pioneering Academic: Remembering Tony Lowe

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

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We celebrated the life and contribution of the late Professor Tony Lowe at a series of events on 3 June.

Over 70 attendees came for a day of events at Sheffield University Management School organised by members of the Accounting and Financial Management (AFM) Division and the Centre for Research into Accounting and Finance in Context (CRAFiC).

Head of the AFM Division at Sheffield, Professor Bill Lee, said: “We were delighted to welcome guests from academic and practitioner backgrounds, as well as individuals who knew Tony personally. I was very honoured to welcome many of Tony’s family who helped us during the ceremony to rename the Lowe Lecture Theatre in the Management School.”

“Tony Lowe was the University of Sheffield’s first Professor of Accounting and Financial Management and led The Sheffield School of accounting research, so to see him honoured in the building was very important to us.”

The day began with the Early Career Researcher and PhD workshop and an introductory lecture from Professor Lisa Jack (Portsmouth) discussing social theory and accounting research. The workshop was co-organised with the BAFA Inter-Disciplinary Perspectives SIG and was supported by the Management Control Association. Attendees then split into groups of six to analyse how social theory can be applied to help understand current events. Bill Lee (Sheffield), Doris Merkl-Davies (Bangor), Robin Roslender (Dundee) and Lesley Catchpowle (Greenwich) led these groups.

Following lunch, there was a comprehensive feedback session and discussion on the morning’s events and the naming ceremony. Attendees then filled the Lowe Memorial Lecture Theatre ahead of a panel session discussing the relevance of The Sheffield School today.

Dean of the Management School, Professor David Oglethorpe, and Professor Bill Lee opened proceedings and introduced the panel which was facilitated by Professor John Cullen and comprised Emeritus Professor Richard Laughlin (Kings College, London), Professor Prem Sikka (Essex), Professor Christine Cooper (Strathclyde) and Professor Jane Broadbent (Royal Holloway).

The discussion was broad, but also introduced fascinating insights into Tony’s life and career. While Richard discussed The Sheffield School’s basic principles, Prem touched on how accounting academics can engage the political arena. Meanwhile, Christine profiled the effect of neoliberalism on society and higher education and Jane presented the history of the Management Control Association (MCA), which Tony had helped to found, and the need to revisit The Sheffield School’s original debates. A lively Q&A session followed.

As attendees retired for supper, Dr Stewart Smyth (co-director of CRAFiC) read tributes to Tony which we received from those who couldn’t attend. He concluded: “The day was a fitting tribute to a man who contributed so much to the School, and to the accounting and financial management as a whole. It was an honour to celebrate Tony’s legacy at Sheffield University Management School.”

 

Find out more about CRAFiC
Find out more about The Sheffield School and Prof Anthony Lowe

Forward thinking: Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Regional Development conference comes to Sheffield

Friday, June 12th, 2015

Dr-Nick-Williams

If the Northern Powerhouse is going to come to fruition, locations like the Sheffield City Region need to innovate. With this in mind, the timely arrival of the eighth International Conference for Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Regional Development (ICEIRD2015) in the city next week is certainly appropriate.

The conference which aims to address key factors in fostering entrepreneurship at national and regional level, share good practice in innovation research, facilitate regional partnerships and promote open innovation networks, is being hosted by academic members of the Centre for Regional Economic and Enterprise Development (CREED), a group of researchers at Sheffield University Management School (University of Sheffield).

Conference Chair, Dr Nick Williams (pictured), said: “Sheffield is a city which is changing, moving from traditional industries to a modern, diverse economy. The debates which take place at ICEIRD2015, regarding how city and regional economies can bounce back from crisis and grow again directly reflect the policy debates taking place in Sheffield and elsewhere.

“CREED is a leading research centre producing cutting edge work on entrepreneurship, innovation and regional development. It therefore provides a natural home for the conference, which is being held at the heart of the University of Sheffield campus. We hope our international delegation will enjoy not only the rigorous academic panel sessions, but also the energy of our city and the university itself.”

Keynote speakers include Professor Susan Marlow of the University of Nottingham who will present on ‘searching for the elusive female entrepreneur’, Professor Aard Groen from the University of Twente discussing ‘Entrepreneurial ecosystems’ and Michael Kitson of Cambridge University who opens his dialogue on ‘The role of the university in the innovation ecosystem’.
Sheffield’s world-class conference facilities will play host to ICEIRD2015, which is to be held at INOX, in the University of Sheffield Students’ Union.

Dr Williams continued: “ICEIRD2015 will focus on how entrepreneurship and innovation can help to drive regional and city economies to grow. Much of the focus will be on how the recent economic crisis has presented challenges and how these may be overcome through effective policy.

“Sheffield University Management School is producing leading research on these topics and will contribute to the debates taking place across the two days.”

Find out more about ICEIRD2015 on the website: www.iceird2015.com

The King of SPIN – Neil Rackham returns to ‘shake things up’

Thursday, February 26th, 2015

Neil Rackham

Two decades on, his 1995 text, SPIN Selling, is still lauded as the most influential sales book of all time, and more than half the US Fortune 500 use models from that research to train their sales teams. Professor Neil Rackham’s studies have stood the test of time, but as he makes clear in this interview – it’s important to evolve. In his own words: “It’s a Darwinian world out there. Adapt or die.”

In March we welcome US-based Neil back to these shores as Visiting Professor to Sheffield University Management School. Ahead of his return, we spoke to him about the sales and marketing sector where he has such legacy, his current research and any advice he may have for our students.

On the state of the sector, Neil identifies a number of key shifts in sales and marketing, albeit in the USA: “The integration of sales and marketing or, at least, a major shift in how they work together is finally underway. It’s curious that the only two functions in the organisation with an identical mission – the generation of profitable revenue – should so rarely work well together. A few years ago, Professor Philip Kotler and I wrote an article in Harvard Business Review called ‘Ending the war between sales and marketing’. It created a lot of interest; less because of the article itself, more because many senior executives thought that they had big problems in this area.

“The internet has forced new thinking and has taken over the selling of simple products. In many companies, marketing now does the selling, using the website, social media and telesales. Sales, meanwhile, has focused on high level, complex business-to-business selling. This change has altered the way companies think the roles of sales and marketing.”

As a University of Sheffield alumnus, Neil remembers the city fondly and has some advice for students considering a career in the sales and marketing arena: “As little as five years ago, if a student asked me if they should make a career in sales or marketing, I would tell them, ‘It’s a great place to start, but don’t stay there too long unless your sole objective is to make money: you’ll die of boredom’. Not so today. A background in both marketing and sales is an invaluable springboard to senior management success. Selling, in particular, has become complex, strategic and professional – it’s about creativity; nothing to do with the old stereotypes of persuasion and pushiness. It’s about creating new value.

“However, the days are long gone when you could succeed in either sales or marketing by seat-of-the-pants methods. Just like a doctor, lawyer, architect or any other profession, there’s a need for certification, standards and continuing professional development. The field is moving incredibly fast: the knowledge you had three years ago is already nearing the end of its shelf life. Bodies like the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) have an increasingly important role in keeping us up-to-date and providing an assurance to potential employers that we are competent professionals.

As well as speaking at the Management School on 12 March, Neil is looking forward to developing his research network and working with students: “What I hope to do at Sheffield University Management School is to inspire some smart and talented students to enter this exciting and fast-moving area. I always learn from working with students – much more than I learn from working in boardrooms. I get out of it a whole lot of ideas. I’m fed up with explaining social media to geriatric senior managers. I love it when a student tells me things I didn’t know about, say, trending bloggers.”

As this article noted earlier, Neil’s popular texts are still influencing sales teams worldwide and his research career hasn’t slowed down – though it has a slightly different focus: “I’ve lost interest in the large corporations like IBM, Oracle or Citicorp who funded my early research. Most of the new wealth today isn’t being generated by these dinosaurs. It’s coming from small nimble companies that are creative and fun to work with. That’s where I like to be.

“The methods I pioneered in the 1980s, by all rights, should be long extinct in 2015. But they are not. There’s a wide perception in business that the methods still work. Of course they have to adapt to new times and I can see a lot of possible changes I’d like to explore, but the fundamentals are still alive and well.

“My present research concerns ‘pipelines’. In sales, a pipeline is the amount of business a company has where the sale has been started but may not result in a final contract for a year or more. I’m interested in things like how do you speed the rate of flow in this pipe and how do you increase its yield. I’m also working on sales and marketing integration and I find myself fascinated with how really big sales are made; where there may be a team of 50 people working on one billion dollar sale. That’s exciting stuff. It really gets your adrenaline going to know that tomorrow you’re going to hear if you’ve won or lost one of these giant contacts.”

Neil’s research is still hugely popular, but it’s how this has influenced his practice that also interests us. As founder of Huthwaite International, a global research and consulting firm based close to Sheffield, he has always been concerned with the role of sales and marketing practitioners in an organisational context. We asked Neil to elaborate on how important it is that this sector is represented on a company board: “The big contribution that sales and marketing make to corporate boards is to bring the voice of the customer. That’s often sorely missing – even today – in traditional companies. I confidently predict that both sales and marketing will have an increasing presence, and an increasing impact, at board level in the future.”

In many sectors, this is a controversial proposition indeed. Then again, Neil’s never been afraid to cause a stir: “In my student days at Sheffield, when I was Secretary of the Union [my membership is still up to date] I was a loud and enthusiastic troublemaker. Today I’m less loud and a little more subtle about it but, once a troublemaker, always a troublemaker. I hope to shake a few things up – in a professional and professorial way, of course.”

We’re confident that the world of sales and marketing will be eternally grateful for Neil’s troublemaking ways. We look forward to welcoming them back to Sheffield University Management School in March.

Book your place for Neil’s talk on 12 March on our Management Gateway – click here.

Outreach to India – Dr Kumar publicises the green agenda

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

Niraj Kumar

Dr Niraj Kumar, lecturer in logistics and supply chain management at Sheffield University Management School (pictured above, front row wearing blue shirt), has been passing on his expertise to schoolchildren in the state of Jharkhand, India.

They invited him to talk about his experience in sustainability, and Dr Kumar hopes that by passing on this information, a new generation of Indian youngsters will be more aware of the issues affecting our planet.

He said: “Over the summer, I was involved in educational outreach activities with a school (Saraswati Shishu Vidya Mandir) in a small town known as Hazaribag in the state of Jharkhand, India. I was invited to visit the school, and to interact with more than 250 students of 11-15 years age. The purpose of my visit was to inform and encourage young students to adopt sustainable practices in their daily lives, in a friendly and interactive environment.

“Developing countries like India are often criticised for poor performance on sustainability indicators, and I believe that the real change can only be made by working with young children, who can not only change their own practices but can also influence their parents to adopt sustainable practices in their daily lives. If we really want to provide a greener and cleaner earth to future generations, we must need to develop ‘green thinking’ in young minds.”

Dr Kumar enjoyed his visit, and plans to return in 2015.

SUMS brings in the numbers

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

F-D_LectureTheatre   DO_AF-D   Networking2

Keeping a room of the region’s most prominent accountants and financers entertained after work is a tall order – but Sheffield University Management School’s lecture rose to the challenge on Wednesday 12 March.

A lively programme of speakers, headed up by Lloyds Bank’s Head of Macroeconomics Adam Chester, followed networking in the School’s new business engagement space.

As the first public lecture held since the refurbished Management School building, on Conduit Road, opened its doors, Professor Anthony Fretwell-Downing officially cut the ribbon to his namesake lecture theatre and spoke to the audience about businesses adjusting to change in a challenging economy.

Dean of Sheffield University Management School, Professor David Oglethorpe (pictured above, centre with Prof Fretwell-Dowling), also spoke on the evening. He said of the event: “It was a privilege to host such a highly regarded assembly of guests at the School. Complemented by a number of our students who chose to attend, the evening’s networking had a fantastic buzz, and the speakers were very well received.

“As the inaugural lecture in our Fretwell-Downing Lecture Theatre, we were delighted with the turnout and welcome others to attend our future events, such as Graham Honeyman’s approaching lecture on the ups and downs of building Forgemasters.”

“Adam Chester’s talk, discussing whether the economic recovery is sustainable, was extremely current and provided a fascinating insight into where Lloyds Bank see the country’s future in economic terms. A lively question and answer session was a fitting conclusion.”

Over 100 guests attended the lecture, 20 of whom went on to a roundtable event at the University of Sheffield’s Inox Dine restaurant.

Head of External Relations, Ian Proctor, said: “This was the first of many exciting events that we have planned at the School. We were delighted to hear Professor Fretwell-Downing speak in the theatre made possible by his generous donation.”

Visit the Management Gateway (http://management.sheffield.ac.uk) for information on up-coming events.

Esteemed speaker Prof Rolf Van Dick visits SUMS

Monday, February 24th, 2014

RolfVD2  RolfVD1

Learning more about the “I and We” in Stress

On Wednesday 19 February Rolf Van Dick, Professor of Social Psychology at Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany, visited the Institute of Work Psychology (IWP) at Sheffield University Management School to give a talk about social identity and stress.

Drawing from years of research and hundreds of studies, he concluded that what we perceive as stressful is clearly related to the standards of the group we are part of. His talk attracted a great deal of interest and a lively discussion from a crowd of researchers – staff and students alike. IWP is looking forward to future collaborations with Professor Van Dick’s team.

He spoke as part of the School’s Distinguished Speaker Series.

 

IWP conference: Early bird registration open now!

From 24-26 June, the biannual IWP International Conference will take place at Sheffield University Management School and Sheffield Town Hall.

The academic conference draws world-wide interest and is preceded by a number of workshops specifically tailored for practitioners and businesses. Limited places are available – early bird registration open now! For more information see http://iwpconference.group.shef.ac.uk/registration/

 

IWP open day 2014

We welcomed a group of keen students to the school to discover more about taking our MSc in Occupational Psychology or Work Psychology.

A wonderful group of staff, including programme director Dr Carolyn Axtell, made them feel very welcome and a good (as well as informative!) time was had by all. To find our more about the programmes, visit:

http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/management/study/msc/courses/msc_occupational_psychology/index

http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/management/study/msc/courses/msc_work_psychology/index

Leading the discussion: Come to our Finance Panel Event

Friday, October 18th, 2013

CourtyardTo maintain its place as a world-leading department, Sheffield University Management School ensures that its courses are informed by the global financial markets and that links with industry are cemented in events such as this Expert Panel, ‘Financial Hindsight, Insight and Foresight’.

Guests are invited on Wednesday 23 October 2013 for an evening of networking and lively discussion, where the panel – assembled by Sheffield University Management School – focuses on a range of topics including economic outlooks, current company performances, the state of financial markets, the regulatory environment and corporate funding.

Our panel includes highly-regarded professionals from the investment, banking, higher-education and legal sectors (further details below). The scene is set for a fascinating evening of reflection and expert knowledge.

Students at the University of Sheffield are also welcome to attend this event.

 

Date: Wednesday 23rd October 2013

Venue: Sheffield University Management School, Conduit Road, Sheffield S10 1FL

Contact/Confirm attendance: mgt.employability@sheffield.ac.uk

Times: 6-6:30pm (networking), 6:30-8pm (panel discussion)

Parking: Northumberland Road university car park, free

Confirmed Panel: James Lanchbery (Senior Investment Director, Investec); Jonathan Thompson (Head of Business Development (North), Santander), Dorrien Peters (Legal Director, DLA Piper), Dan Fell (Deputy CEO, Doncaster Chamber), Chair – Professor John Cullen (Professor of Management Accounting and Associate Dean for Knowledge Exchange, Sheffield University Management School)

Light refreshments will be served

Leading organisational psychology expert Professor Cary Cooper shares insight into the wellbeing agenda

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

Carey-Cooper

The Management School was delighted to host Distinguished Professor of Organisational Psychology and Health at Lancaster University Management School, Cary Cooper, CBE at the University here in Sheffield on the 1st of May to share his expertise on the wellbeing agenda.

Professor Cooper is the author and editor of more than 125 books and is one of Britain’s most quoted business gurus.

This special lecture explored the  wellbeing agenda including new pressures that are emerging on people at work during the current times. Professor Cooper also discussed the costs of stress at work and the strategies for dealing with these issues.

The event was well attended and gave interesting topics for discussion amongst staff and students from the Management School and the faculty.

More about Professor Cary Cooper:
As well as Professor at Lancaster University, he is a founding President of the British Academy of Management, a Companion of the Chartered Management Institute and one of only 5 UK Fellows of the (American) Academy of Management,  President of the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy and President of RELATE.

Professor Cooper was the Founding Editor of the Journal of Organizational Behavior, Editor of the scholarly journal Stress and Health and is the Editor  (with Professor Chris Argyris of Harvard Business School and Professor Bill Starbuck of New York University as Associate Editors) of the Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Management.

He has been an advisor to the World Health Organisation, ILO, and EU in the field of occupational health research and wellbeing, was Chair of the Global Agenda Council on Chronic Disease of the World Economic Forum (2009-2010) and is Chair of the Academy of Social Sciences (comprising 43 learned societies in the social sciences and over 87,000members). In 2001 he was awarded the CBE by the Queen for his contributions to organisational health and safety.

How to drive social change? Best practices for business leaders and social enterprises

Tuesday, March 5th, 2013

How to drive social change? Best practices for business leaders and social enterprises

Research by academics at the University of Sheffield Management breaks new ground by developing an evidence-based framework to understand how organisations can drive positive social change.

 ute_driven_social-ChangeThe team including Dr Ute Stephan, Dr Malcolm Patterson and Ciara Kelley synthesized 20 years of research published across multiple academic disciplines and including practitioner research. They developed a report as a handbook for organisations, which details specific actions organisations can take to successfully create behaviour change.

 Ute Stephan the lead author of the report says “We highlight 19 mechanisms of behaviour change, showcase different change strategies, and how change projects should be managed. Because our report is based on a systematic review of evidence it includes mechanism and strategies that are known to work. Organisations can use it to develop new strategies or benchmark their current efforts, for instance to pinpoint barriers to delivering social impact.” Although primarily written from the perspective of businesses and social enterprises, the authors believe that non-profits and public sector organisations will also find it useful to consult the social change framework.

The research benefited greatly from its international advisors including Professor Johanna Mair (Stanford University and Hertie School of Governance), Rob Briner (University of Bath), Jo Rick (Manchester University) and managers from Canadian industry leaders. The research could not have been produced without the financial and intellectual assistance of the Network for Business Sustainability (nbs.net).

Interested to learn more?

  • Visit the project website [ust1]
  • Read the report: Stephan, U., Patterson, M. & Kelly, C. (2013). Business-driven social change: A systematic review of the evidence. Network for Business Sustainability. download[US2]
  • Hear Ute Stephan talk through the main findings in a webinar for practitioners (Wednesday, April 10 at 6pm (UK, 1pm EST) or Tuesday, April 16 at 5pm (UK, 12pm EST)).
    Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/4342366491738209024

Click here for a recording of the webinar.

 

Hidden cyberbullying is as common as conventional counterpart in the workplace

Monday, November 12th, 2012

Cyberbullying through e-mail, text and web posts is as common in the workplace as conventional bullying but even more difficult to uncover, research by experts from the University of Sheffield has revealed.

Occupational psychologists Dr Christine Sprigg, Dr Carolyn Axtell and Sam Farley of the University of Sheffield, together with Dr Iain Coyne of the University of Nottingham, turned the focus of their investigation onto cyberbullying of adult workers, instead of younger people in schools, for which more research has taken place.

The results of their research was revealed at a seminar during the Economic and Social Research Council’s (ESRC) annual Festival of Social Science at an event in the Showroom Workstation, Paternoster Row, on Wednesday 7 November 2012 from 5pm until 8pm.

The team will also make suggestions on how employers should tackle and prevent cyberbullying in the workplace. Researchers believe that cyberbullying will become more important as communication technologies continue to evolve and become more widespread.

The study included three separate surveys among employees in several UK universities, asking people about their experiences of cyberbullying in the workplace.

Survey respondents were given a list of what can be classed as bullying, such as being humiliated, ignored or gossiped about, and were asked if they had faced such behaviour online and how often.

Of the 320 people who responded to the survey, around eight out of ten had experienced one of the listed cyberbullying behaviours on at least one occasion in the previous six months.

The results also showed 14 to 20 per cent experienced them at least once a week – a similar rate to conventional bullying. The research team also examined the impact of cyberbullying on workers’ mental strain and wellbeing.

“Our research showed that cyberbullying has a stronger negative impact on employee mental strain and job satisfaction than traditional, face to face bullying does,” said Dr Axtell.

The research team also found that the impact of witnessing cyberbullying was different than that seen for conventional bullying.

“In more traditional, face to face bullying, seeing someone else being bullied also has a negative impact on the wellbeing of the witness,” said Dr. Sprigg. “However, we didn’t find the same negative effect for those who said they had witnessed others being cyberbullied.

“This might be because we are less aware of other people’s reactions online, and so the witnesses might not empathise so much with the victims.  This could potentially mean that they are less likely to intervene,” Dr Axtell added.

The results of the research, which was partly funded by Sheffield University Management School, will be presented at a seminar to business representatives. “We believe our research will likely have implications for the way that employers formulate policies and guidelines relating to cyberbullying, and the seminar will be an opportunity for us to discuss our findings and learn about the experiences of other employers,” Dr Coyne said.

The research has attracted widespread press coverage including the Daily Mail, French Tribune and the newsworks website.

http://frenchtribune.com/teneur/1214278-concern-over-cyberbullying-workplace

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2226572/Cyberbullying-workplace-widespread.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/local/item/46822-cyberbullying-common-among-adults-study-finds