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Posts Tagged ‘Axtell’

Celebrated authors: Best paper awards for SUMS researchers

Tuesday, June 6th, 2017

A number of papers from academics at the Management School have been acknowledged as outstanding across revered journals.

In the annual Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence, two papers from SUMS were deemed the best of the year. The International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research named a paper by Dr Ranis Cheng and Dr Mike Simpson from Sheffield University Management School, alongside lead author Dr Sheilagh Resnick (Nottingham Trent University) and Dr Fernando Lourenco (Institute for Tourism Studies, Macau) ‘Marketing in SMEs: a “4P” self-branding model’, as outstanding.

Meanwhile, the Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal crowned a paper by Dr Panayiota (Julie) Alevizou and Dr Caroline Oates with Dr Claudia Henninger (University of Manchester), called ‘What is sustainable fashion?’.

Both articles are freely available to all for one year and will be promoted as the journal sample article.

From the Institute of Work Psychology, Dr Carolyn Axtell’s paper alongside the University of Manchester’s David Holman, ‘Can job redesign interventions influence a broad range of employee outcomes by changing multiple job characteristics? A quasi-experimental study’ has been awarded Best Paper by the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology.

Finally, a paper by Sheffield’s Prof Tim Vorley and Dr Nick Williams (University of Leeds) won the prize for Best Paper from the International Small Business Journal. Entitled ‘Between petty corruption and criminal extortion: How entrepreneurs in Bulgaria and Romania operate within a devil’s circle’, you can click here to read the paper.

IWP launches Research Update 2014

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014

The Institute of Work Psychology (IWP), part of Sheffield University Management School, is delighted to announce the release of its Research Update 2014.

Collating just a few of the IWP’s fantastic research successes and ongoing projects, the publication documents work from prominent members of staff including Professor Peter Warr, Dr Carolyn Axtell, Dr David E Rast, Professor Penny Dick, Dr Kamal Birdi, Dr Eva Selenko, Dr Malcolm Patterson and Dr Jeremy Dawson. It also covers the work by the Institute’s high-achieving group of early career researchers and PhD students.

Read it online here, or see the document below. If you’d like to hear from the IWP in the future, email IWP-researchupdate@sheffield.ac.uk

Cyberbullying in the workplace

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

Cyberbullying through e-mail, text and web posts is as common in the workplace as conventional bullying but even more difficult to uncover, research by experts from the University of Sheffield has revealed.

Occupational psychologists Dr Christine Sprigg, Dr Carolyn Axtell and Sam Farley of the University of Sheffield, together with Dr Iain Coyne of the University of Nottingham, turned the focus of their investigation onto cyberbullying of adult workers, instead of younger people in schools, for which more research has taken place.

The results of their research will be revealed at a seminar during the Economic and Social Research Council’s (ESRC) annual Festival of Social Science at an event in the Showroom Workstation, Paternoster Row, on Wednesday 7 November 2012 from 5pm until 8pm.

The team will also make suggestions on how employers should tackle and prevent cyberbullying in the workplace. Researchers believe that cyberbullying will become more important as communication technologies continue to evolve and become more widespread.

The study included three separate surveys among employees in several UK universities, asking people about their experiences of cyberbullying in the workplace.

Survey respondents were given a list of what can be classed as bullying, such as being humiliated, ignored or gossiped about, and were asked if they had faced such behaviour online and how often.

Of the 320 people who responded to the survey, around eight out of ten had experienced one of the listed cyberbullying behaviours on at least one occasion in the previous six months.

The results also showed 14 to 20 per cent experienced them at least once a week – a similar rate to conventional bullying. The research team also examined the impact of cyberbullying on workers’ mental strain and wellbeing.

“Our research showed that cyberbullying has a stronger negative impact on employee mental strain and job satisfaction than traditional, face to face bullying does,” said Dr Axtell.

The research team also found that the impact of witnessing cyberbullying was different than that seen for conventional bullying.

“In more traditional, face to face bullying, seeing someone else being bullied also has a negative impact on the wellbeing of the witness,” said Dr. Sprigg. “However, we didn’t find the same negative effect for those who said they had witnessed others being cyberbullied.

“This might be because we are less aware of other people’s reactions online, and so the witnesses might not empathise so much with the victims. This could potentially mean that they are less likely to intervene,” Dr Axtell added.

The results of the research, which was partly funded by Sheffield University Management School, will be presented at a seminar to business representatives. “We believe our research will likely have implications for the way that employers formulate policies and guidelines relating to cyberbullying, and the seminar will be an opportunity for us to discuss our findings and learn about the experiences of other employers,” Dr Coyne said.

Additional information

Festival of Social Science

The Festival of Social Science is run by the Economic and Social Research Council and takes place from 3-10 November 2012. With events from some of the country’s leading social scientists, the Festival celebrates the very best of British social science research and how it influences our social, economic and political lives – both now and in the future.

This year’s Festival of Social Science has over 170 creative and exciting events across the UK to encourage businesses, charities, government agencies, schools and college students to discuss, discover and debate topical social science issues. Press releases detailing some of the varied events are available at the Festival website. You can now follow updates from the Festival on twitter using #esrcfestival.

The University of Sheffield

With nearly 25,000 students from 125 countries, the University of Sheffield is one of the UK’s leading and largest universities. A member of the Russell Group, it has a reputation for world-class teaching and research excellence across a wide range of disciplines. The University of Sheffield has been named University of the Year in the Times Higher Education Awards for its exceptional performance in research, teaching, access and business performance. In addition, the University has won four Queen’s Anniversary Prizes (1998, 2000, 2002, and 2007).

These prestigious awards recognise outstanding contributions by universities and colleges to the United Kingdom’s intellectual, economic, cultural and social life. Sheffield also boasts five Nobel Prize winners among former staff and students and many of its alumni have gone on to hold positions of great responsibility and influence around the world. The University’s research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls-Royce, Unilever, Boots, AstraZeneca, GSK, ICI, Slazenger, and many more household names, as well as UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations.

The University has well-established partnerships with a number of universities and major corporations, both in the UK and abroad. Its partnership with Leeds and York Universities in the White Rose Consortium has a combined research power greater than that of either Oxford or Cambridge.

Contact

For further information please contact:

Paul Mannion
Media Relations Officer
The University of Sheffield
0114 222 9851
p.f.mannion@sheffield.ac.uk

 

ESRC event: Cyberbullying in the workplace

Friday, October 5th, 2012

The Management School is pleased to announce the Institute of Work Psychology has successfully secured funding for an ESRC event as part of the Festival of Social Sciences.

Date: 7 November 2012
Time: 5-8pm
Venue: Showroom 5, Showroom Workstation, 15 Paternoster Row, Sheffield, S1 2BX
To register: Click here to register your free place at the seminar

This seminar forms part of the Economic and Social Research Council’s (ESRC) Festival of Social Science.  Dr Christine Sprigg, Dr Carolyn Axtell and Sam Farley (all at the Institute of Work Psychology (IWP), Management School) and Dr Iain Coyne (at the Institute of Work, Health & Organisations (I-WHO), University of Nottingham), will outline the findings of their recent research in this seminar entitled ‘Punched from the screen: Cyberbullying in the workplace.’

The study, one of the first on workplace cyberbullying in the UK, explores the prevalence, impact and frequency of cyberbullying amongst 320 university staff members.

Who should attend?
This event is aimed at local and national businesses.

Further information:

The Festival of Social Science is run by the Economic and Social Research Council and takes place from 3-10 November 2012. With events from some of the country’s leading social scientists, the Festival celebrates the very best of British social science research and how it influences our social, economic and political lives – both now and in the future. This year’s Festival of Social Science has over 180 creative and exciting events across the UK to encourage businesses, charities, government agencies, schools and college students to discuss, discover and debate topical social science issues. Press releases detailing some of the varied events and a full list of the programme are available at the Festival website. You can now follow updates from the Festival on twitter using #esrcfestival

Tackling cyberbullying in the workplace

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

Dr Christine Sprigg (IWP) with colleagues Dr Carolyn Axtell (IWP) , Dr Iain Coyne (IWHO, Nottingham University) and Sam Farley (incoming IWP GTA PhD Student) have been awarded money from ESRC to organise an event called “Punched from the Screen: The Psychology of Workplace Cyberbullying”. The project builds on the outcomes of Management School Research Stimulation money awarded to the team last year.

Cyberbullying, which uses technology as the media to abuse individuals, is the ‘new kid on the block’ in bullying terms. Cyberbullying is now almost of daily media interest. The event, which will form part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science, later this year will be a participative three hour seminar on cyberbullying in the workplace for 25 business stakeholders. The aim of the event is to discuss this topic with representatives of the business community, to explain what contribution work psychology can make to understanding the phenomena, assessing how it may differ from traditional bullying, and limiting the damage of it to employees. The researchers are also interested in identifying current experiences and practices of dealing with cyberbullying from the participants’ perspectives.

The team’s current research examines cyberbullying from a work psychology perspective, specifically looking at the relationship between cyberbullying and employee wellbeing.  This event is an important forum to showcase the applied nature of work psychologists as social scientists in a relatively new topic area. Current research findings and ideas will be disseminated to participants. However, the researchers are also keen to understand the experiences and viewpoints of the target audience and how this may feed into their future research.