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Posts Tagged ‘CEES’

Recycling e-waste worth up to 3.7 billion euros to Europe

Monday, August 17th, 2015

Lenny Koh

Recycling waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) more effectively could be worth up to 3.7 billion euros to the European market as well as reducing environmental pollution, an award winning research paper has found.

Professor Lenny Koh from the Management School along with colleagues Federica Cucciella, Idiano D’Adomo and Paolo Rosa from the University of L’Aquila and Politecnico di Milano have recently published a paper entitled ‘Recycling of WEEEs: an economic assessment of present and future e-waste streams’.

Waste electrical and electronic equipment is currently considered to be one of the fastest growing waste streams in the world, with an estimated growth rate between three and five per cent each year.

Professor Koh, Director of Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC) and a world leading expert on low carbon supply chains, said: “We have been working on the collaborative research for several years with the University of L’Aquila and Politecnico di Milano. This builds from our prior research on turning waste into resource, resource efficiency and circular economy.

“In particular, this research has strong relevance to addressing global issues of materials availability and security, reducing reliance on unused non-renewable materials, especially precious, critical and rare earth materials in manufacturing for sustainability and for consideration for substitution.”

The paper presents a comprehensive framework supporting the decision-making process of multiple electronic recycling centres. The assessment defined the potential revenues coming from the recovery of valuable materials, such as gold and platinum, in 14 electronic items including notebooks, monitors, smartphones, hard drives and tablets using current and future disposed quantities in Europe.

It found that recycling electronic waste was equal to 2.15 billion euros in overall potential revenue to the European market in 2014 and could rise to 3.67 billion euros by 2020. As well as providing a significant source of revenue, more effective recovery of materials could benefit the environment by reducing manufacturers’ reliance on unprocessed resources.

Professor Koh added: “The recycling of e-waste could allow the diminishing use of virgin resources in manufacturing and, consequently, it could contribute in reducing environmental pollution.

“Given that EU has tried over the last two decades to develop a circular economy based on the exploitation of resources recovered by wastes, this research is key evidence to influence both industry and government on the financial and economic value of materials recovery of WEEE.”

With the development of new electronic items and waste set to increase, the research highlights the need for manufacturers and recycling centres to work more closely together in order to recover more material from disposed equipment. It also recommends needed the development of more flexible recycling plants able to intercept different types of end of life products.

Following publication earlier this month, the research has been recognised by academic publisher Elsevier with the prestigious Atlas Award.

The award recognises scientific research that has an impact on people around the world and is selected by an advisory board based on suggestions from the publishers of Elsevier’s 1,800 journals each month.

Professor Gill Valentine, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for the Faculty of Social Sciences, said: “I am delighted to hear that Professor Koh and her colleagues have been recognised with the Elsevier Atlas Award. This insightful work demonstrates the significant impact research here at the University can have on our world and the environment.”

An award ceremony for the presentation of the Elsevier Atlas Award will be announced soon.

Supporting supply chain resource sustainability

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Fifty-one industry representatives and academics explored supply chain challenges during a half-day workshop held at the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre to foster closer working relationships between University of Sheffield academics and leading businesses in key strategic areas including advanced materials and manufacturing, energy and nuclear, water and agritech/food.

Professor Lenny Koh, supported by a distinguished team of respected academics, led the Supply Chain Resource Sustainability (SCRS) workshop, helping to shape the vision and programme of supply chain resource sustainability research for translational and high impact performance. The workshop was very well attended, resulted in an informed and diverse range of opinions and identified key collaborative areas, capabilities and tools around supply chain resource sustainability needed by industry to address their resources supply chain challenges.

The workshop also introduced the Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC), a facility for supporting the development of competitive advantage by creating world leading, resource sustainable supply chains through collaborative action between industry and academia, especially in the thematic areas where the University of Sheffield has deep expertise including advanced materials and manufacturing; energy and nuclear; water; and agritech/food.

The three key challenges/priorities in each of these sectors are summarised below. A report will be released in mid September 2014, to be followed by a collaborative steering group meeting.

Environmental and Energy Improvements – European funded collaborative project is thinking big for SMEs

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

MS017

Key international stakeholders in a University of Sheffield managed team met in January 2014 and kick-started a ground-breaking new project which aims to help Small to Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs) deliver both environmental and cost improvements.The European consortium’s initial talks laid foundations for the implementation of a project, EU LLP PrESS (SCEnAT). SCEnAT (Supply Chain Environmental Analysis Tool) has been developed by Professor Lenny Koh, project Principal Investigator and Leader of the Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (CEES) at Sheffield University Management School.

This project will further develop Professor Koh’s SCEnAT tool, which already helps SMEs understand their environmental impact, so that it can deliver carbon emission reductions and real cost reductions.

The consortium comprises four academic members, the University of Sheffield, the University of Lodz (Poland), the University of Naples “Federico II” (Italy) and the South East European Research Centre (SEERC – Greece), working in partnership with four private sector trade organisations from their respective regions. The University of Sheffield’s partner is Sheffield Chamber of Commerce and Industry (SCCI). The collaborative project’s objective is to help SMEs improve their environmental footprint and drive commercial benefits in this internationally competitive world.

Professor Lenny Koh, who is also Associate Dean for Alumni at Sheffield University Management School, said: “We believe that CEES has developed an excellent and simple tool [SCEnAT] which any SME can use to understand its carbon footprint. However, we recognise that most businesses will require help in not only implementing the tool, but also carrying out the beneficial projects that it will identify.

“The European funding gives us a great opportunity to work with three partner universities across Europe to assess SCEnAT’s wider applicability, and to commercialise the tool, making it a real benefit to businesses.”

Richard Wright, Executive Director of Sheffield Chamber of Commerce, added: “SMEs represent the backbone of our economy. We need them to grow and be sustainable economically and environmentally if we are going to deliver a successful future.

“However, it is probably more difficult for SMEs to evaluate the options and implement improvements because they have finite resources, and environmental skills are not always a core capability. For instance, rising energy costs are putting significant strains on many businesses – but the time and skills required to optimise the unit cost do not usually reside within the organisation. SCEnAT and its forthcoming development are designed to tackle that issue.”

For more information on the project go to www.sheffield.ac.uk/scenat-press

This project is funded with the support of the Lifelong Learning Programme of the European Union. This press release reflects on the author’s view and the Agency and Commission are not responsible for any use that made be made of the information it contains.

Energy we can all afford: public meeting and ‘Question Time’

Monday, March 4th, 2013

This winter millions of people across the UK have been struggling to pay their gas and electricity bills, yet energy prices continue to rise. How can we tackle the challenges of fuel poverty, fossil fuels and climate change to create energy we can all afford, warmer homes, lower bills and a cooler planet?

Come and join the debate

Date:  Friday 8 March
Time:  7.30pm start and refreshments from 7pm
Venue:  The Church View Centre, Church View, Doncaster, DN1 1AF (Parking available at rear of entrance, on street and market car park free after 6pm)

Speakers include:

Caroline Flint, State of Energy and Climate Change & MP for Don Valley
Martyn Williams, Energy Bill Revolution
Prof. Lenny Koh, Centre for Energy, Environment & Sustainability at University of Sheffield
Simon Bowens, Friends of the Earth Yorkshire & the Humber

For further information:
Contact Rachel at rachel.hubbard@foe.co.uk  or Tel: 07917 358796.

Organised by Doncaster Friends of the Earth with thanks to Doncaster CDT www.foe.co.uk/doncaster  and www.doncastercdt.org

Independent investigation reveals communities’ thoughts on Government’s Green Deal

Monday, March 4th, 2013

Implications and challenges surrounding the Governments energy-efficiency flagship programme the Green Deal have been raised by University of Sheffield researchers following an investigation into what low income communities in the Yorkshire and Humberside region think of the scheme.

Insulation in a home ©iStockphoto.com/LianeM

Experts from the University of Sheffield, as part of wider research into the BIG Energy Upgrade Programme, held focus groups in six towns and cities across the region to assess initial awareness of the Green Deal by residents in deprived communities.

The Green Deal is one of the flagship policies of the current Coalition Government stimulating economic growth and aiming for carbon emissions reduction, fuel poverty reduction and improved homes.

Initial costs of any improvements are paid for by residents who take out a loan from the Green Deal Finance Company then pay it off through savings to their fuel bills.

The researchers interviewed residents in Leeds, Barnsley, Doncaster, Scunthorpe, Dewsbury and Grimsby in community centres, church halls and cafes.

Although more findings are expected following a thorough analysis of their data, the researchers were able to draw out some feedback including:

  • Many residents who do not own their own homes perceive a financial investment in someone else’s property as unfair and illogical.
  • The Green Deal is good for the local supply chains and the economy.
  • Residents are dubious of the role that banks might play in financing the Green Deal.
  • It will boost the energy efficiency market and creates a low carbon future for our building stocks.
  • Confusion between the Green Deal and other Government initiatives, such as solar panels and the feed-in tariff
  • Residents concluded that it is only a matter of time before their Local Authority or Housing Association will fund interventions across all homes under one scheme or another
  • While the financial savings may be significant in time, increased warmth and comfort are immediate and tangible.

Professor Lenny Koh, who led the project, said: “Green Deal is a strategic and important financial scheme to help people to keep their home warm and afford access to energy. Hence, Green Deal will improve quality of life of individuals.

“It is important that the housing stock is made more energy-efficient and the Green Deal is the right scheme to do that. It has a customised element for the assessment and installation process which makes it tailored to the needs of the user.

“People are dealing with Green Deal approved companies so should get an expected high standard of work. It is also sustainable and should only be implemented when it will definitely benefit residents.”

This work was undertaken as part of the BIG Energy Upgrade Programme, a project part financed by the European Union through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) for the Yorkshire and Humber Programme 2007 – 2013 and utilised additional funding from the University of Sheffield.

For more information on the Big Energy Upgrade please visit: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/bigenergyupgrade

Unique programme to help organisations develop in-house sustainability expertise from The University of Sheffield Management School and C02Sense

Monday, February 11th, 2013

A pioneering new course is being launched by The University of Sheffield Management School in partnership with the low-carbon expert consultancy, CO2Sense, and supported by 2degress, an active sustainable business community that helps businesses and professionals find practical solutions and address their sustainable business challenges.

Starting in March 2013, The Sustainability Leadership Programme will be the first course of its kind to provide a strategic understanding of sustainability through six months of project-based learning where students work on the real-life issues affecting their business. Designed exclusively for executive directors, the programme shows how they can embed sustainability across their entire company in order to achieve long-term success and profitability.

Delegates will also receive expert consultancy support from CO2Sense, who will visit their business and help them to apply knowledge gained from the course into practice. It is expected that participants  will identify a minimum of £5k extra value within their company through the project and will reduce the need for external consultants.

Professor Lenny Koh, Director of Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (CEES) at The University of Sheffield Management School, said:

“Sustainability is key to any business looking to improve their efficiency and performance and to face the challenges of today’s business environment. At Sheffield Management School we strive to develop and deploy innovative ways to advance the understanding of energy, environment and sustainability as we recognise that businesses need senior managers and leaders with these skills.   This unique project-based learning course is specifically designed for senior managers.  The programme equips them  in dealing with the environmental issues they are facing and helps them to become a sustainable and successful business.”

The course has been designed to complement busy schedules with just one day each month dedicated to classroom-based learning. The six lectures will feature presentations from internationally recognised business leaders and academics.. These sessions will explore the main issues around sustainability such as global supply chain issues, employee engagement and planning for severe weather events.

Dr Stephen Brown, director of partnerships and innovation at CO2Sense, says:

“No business can afford to ignore the sustainability agenda. Issues such as diminishing natural resources and energy supply are affecting how we all do business and pose a multitude of risks to long-term operations.  Consequently, we need to adopt  smarter and more innovative ways of working and business leaders are increasingly recognising the role of sustainability as a key driver new forms of value in their business success.

“Demand for senior business leaders who have the skills to navigate this new business environment is high. This course will provide a high-level understanding of sustainability, which in turn will put attendees ahead of their peers and by building in-house skills, companies will reduce the need for external consultants.

“Unlike most high-level courses in sustainability, our programme is project based and means that companies experience the financial benefits of attending the course with almost immediate effect.”

The six month programme costs £2750+VAT. For more information please  email SLP@co2sense.co.uk or visit http://www.co2sense.co.uk/leadership-programme

Notes to Editors

The Sustainability Leadership Programme is the result of a unique partnership between The University of Sheffield Management School and the low carbon consultancy CO2Sense.

The Sustainability Leadership Programme is aimed at executive directors and senior-managers looking to develop their expertise in this field and prepare their business against new environmental and economical challenges. The course is suitable for companies across all sectors.

Please click here http://www.co2sense.co.uk/leadership-programme to view the course structure and modules.

About CO2Sense

CO2Sense is the not-for-profit low-carbon expert company that helps organisations to cut their costs and to improve their environmental performance.

We help organisations to find real cost savings by developing low-carbon strategies, which give no-nonsense, clear direction to reduce energy and water use, to produce less waste and to use fewer raw materials.

We help organisations to generate both free energy and an income by developing renewable electricity and heating installations. Because we’re not trying to sell a particular type of renewable energy, we make sure that organisations install the technologies that will deliver the best possible return for their investment.

We help companies that sell environmental products to develop their business. We find new markets for their products, and we help them to get the right product accreditation to make sure that their customers can buy from them with confidence.

We can also help organisations to get capital investment to help with the costs of installing new renewable energy and other low-carbon installations.

We work with some of the UK’s largest companies to develop new ways of cutting greenhouse gas emissions. For example, we are working with businesses and with government to encourage the development of a carbon capture and storage (CCS) network in Yorkshire.

About The University of Sheffield

With nearly 25,000 students from 125 countries, the University of Sheffield is one of the UK’s leading and largest universities. A member of the Russell Group, it has a reputation for world-class teaching and research excellence across a wide range of disciplines. The University of Sheffield was named University of the Year in the Times Higher Education Awards 2011 for its exceptional performance in research, teaching, access and business performance. In addition, the University has won four Queen’s Anniversary Prizes (1998, 2000, 2002, and 2007).

These prestigious awards recognise outstanding contributions by universities and colleges to the United Kingdom’s intellectual, economic, cultural and social life. Sheffield also boasts five Nobel Prize winners among former staff and students and many of its alumni have gone on to hold positions of great responsibility and influence around the world. The University’s research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls-Royce, Unilever, Boots, AstraZeneca, GSK, ICI, Slazenger, and many more household names, as well as UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations.

The University has well-established partnerships with a number of universities and major corporations, both in the UK and abroad. Its partnership with Leeds and York Universities in the White Rose Consortium has a combined research power greater than that of either Oxford or Cambridge.

ESRC event: Fuel poverty related illnesses

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

A further addition to the Management School’s succession of ESRC Festival of Social Sciences events.

Date: 6 November 2012
Time: 9.30am to 2pm
Venue: University of Sheffield, 169-171 Northumberland Road

How do you find the fuel poor? Perspectives from the front line

With rising fuel poverty figures and a decreasing likelihood of meeting the UK governments’ legislative commitment to eradicating fuel poverty by 2016, the need to take effective action to tackle this social ill has never been more important. Against a background of austerity and economic slow down, how do front line services define fuel poverty, identify the fuel poor and tackle it in their everyday practice?

The Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability at the University of Sheffield plays host to an ESRC Festival of Social Science event seeking to uncover current approaches to fuel poverty, to stimulate debate over best practice and encourage the sharing of practitioners knowledge and academic insight to collaboratively move towards the ultimate erradication of fuel poverty. The event draws together social services, local authorities, social housing providers, community associations, third sector groups, health professionals and academics for what promises to be a lively debate, chaired by experts from within practice and academia.

For practitioners, this event provides an opportunity to understand how other services operate, explain their approach to other partners and develop a best practice approach to tackling fuel poverty. Academics will benefit from engaging with fuel poverty stakeholders to extend their knowledge and understanding of how fuel poverty is approached and how theory is or could be applied in practice.

Further information:

This event is also being supported by the Big Energy Upgrade, a flagship £14.9million, ERDF part-funded, multi partner project linking the University of Sheffield with 6 Local Authorities, 6 ALMOs/social housing providers and YES, an energy advice company to make houses across the Yorkshire and Humber region more energy efficient and reduce their carbon emissions. Find out more about the Big Energy Upgrade here.

The Festival of Social Science is run by the Economic and Social Research Council and takes place from 3-10 November 2012. With events from some of the country’s leading social scientists, the Festival celebrates the very best of British social science research and how it influences our social, economic and political lives – both now and in the future. This year’s Festival of Social Science has over 180 creative and exciting events across the UK to encourage businesses, charities, government agencies, schools and college students to discuss, discover and debate topical social science issues. Press releases detailing some of the varied events and a full list of the programme are available at the Festival website. You can now follow updates from the Festival on twitter using #esrcfestival

The BIG Energy Upgrade Programme (BEU) is working with DECC and EEDO in preparing for the launch of the Green Deal

Friday, March 16th, 2012

The BIG Energy Upgrade Programme has been showcased on DECC’s website as a flagship project for its relevance to the forthcoming Green Deal (http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/news/beu/beu.aspx). This is thanks to the early adoption of the whole-house/whole community approach integrated by work carried out by the Consortium Partners, Yorkshire Energy Services and the University of Sheffield.

The evidence derived from the monitoring and the area-based delivery of retrofit installations will support the activities of the newly established Energy Efficiency Deployment Office (EEDO).

The programme also aims to address fuel poverty in the most deprived communities in the region.

The Management School is playing a major role in the BIG Energy Update Programme  thanks to the work carried out by Professor Lenny Koh as part of the Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability ( http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/cees) and the Logistic and Supply Chain Management Centre (LSCM) (http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/lscm).

Professor Lenny Koh is leading an interdisciplinary team as part of the BIG Energy Upgrade project (http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/bigenergyupgrade) funded by the European Union European Regional Development Fund  (ERDF) and is working innovatively to develop new models, technology and systems to help companies reduce their environmental footprint and understand the public’s level of acceptance of these new practices.

The economic and societal impact of the Management School’s research work on the Low Carbon Supply Chain

Monday, March 5th, 2012

The University of Sheffield has released new videos (http://www.youtube.com/user/ResearchatSheffield) that showcase the impact of its research activities. The Management School is playing a major role in the Environmental Research Theme thanks to the work carried out by Professor Lenny Koh as part of the Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/cees) and the Logistic and Supply Chain Management Centre (LSCM) (http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/lscm).

Professor Lenny Koh is leading an interdisciplinary team as part of the BIG Energy Upgrade project (http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/bigenergyupgrade) funded by the European Union European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and is working innovatively to develop new models, technology and systems to help companies reduce their environmental footprint and understand the public’s level of acceptance of these new practices.