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Posts Tagged ‘Energy’

The BIG Energy Upgrade programme invites companies to tender for the project’s website

Friday, January 6th, 2012

The University of Sheffield, on behalf of the BIG Energy Upgrade programme (BEU), is now inviting interested web design companies to tender for the development of the BEU’s website.

The website will be a very important tool through which the BEU programme will disseminate information on its ongoing activities and achievements to the all interested stakeholders and to the general public. The website will become an important resource for UK businesses and policy makers working on the Climate Change agenda and around the Green Deal initiative.

Information about the tender:

Further information about the BIG Energy Upgrade:
The Big Energy Upgrade is a regional flagship project addressing the priority needs of both reduction in carbon emissions and the creation of jobs. To address the issues in an integrated approach the University of Sheffield has brought together a multidisciplinary team of academics working alongside Local Authorities, ALMOs, social housing providers and an energy services company. The Big Energy Upgrade, is delivered by a consortium of local authorities and social housing providers, led by Kirklees Council, is a very ambitious project as, for the first time in the UK, the Partners will work together in adopting a fully integrated, whole-house approach while installing energy efficiency measures and micro generation technologies in households. Through individual household assessments the project will identify a highly individual package of measures for each of the households and which will provide optimal insulation and energy control to the house. Ten disadvantaged communities across Yorkshire and the Humber will be targeted by the scheme.

The University plays a key role in the project by providing a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding and optimising the interrelated technological, behavioural and economic factors. A team of academics is monitoring the performance of the installed energy efficiency measures. study the material’s lifecycle, look at behaviour of those living in the newly insulated houses as well as at the communities interested by the intervention, monitor energy consumption in selected households and support the supply chain associated with the energy efficiency measures particularly the one associated with the external solid wall insulation.

The project addresses key national priorities of:

  • reducing CO2 emissions from the installed base of residential dwellings, required to meet national CO2 reduction
  • alleviating fuel-poverty
  • driving regional economic growth in this expanding field

The results of the project have particular relevance for the forthcoming Green Deal, a government initiative which is launched in March 2012. The project, to retrofit energy-efficiency and renewable-energy measured to residential dwellings is the largest such venture in the UK.

The lead for the University activity is Professor Lenny Koh (Management School), with Professor Steve Banwart (Cross-cutting Director of Research and Innovation for Energy and Environment).

Led by Kirklees Council, the BEU project it includes (as well as the University of Sheffield) the following partners:

Also see:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/mediacentre/2011/big-energy-upgrade-climate-change-secretary-state.html and http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/bigenergyupgrade

The BIG Energy Upgrade launched in Sheffield by the Rt Hon Chris Huhne

Friday, September 30th, 2011

An innovative project, which is set to install low carbon measures in houses in some of the most deprived areas in Yorkshire and Humber, was launched on Thursday 29 September 2011 at the University of Sheffield ICOSS centre, by the Rt Hon Chris Huhne, MP, Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change.

The launch featured a key note address from the Rt Hon Chris Huhne who explained the importance of tackling energy efficiency.

He said: “Energy efficiency is a no brainer because it makes homes warmer and cheaper to run. The Big Energy Upgrade is a great example of different organisations working together to help the most disadvantaged communities in Yorkshire. We want to see more of this collaborative working to help the effectiveness of the Green Deal when it’s launched next year. The new Green Deal will be the biggest home improvement plan since the second world war, helping to insulate people against rising energy prices at no upfront cost.”

The BIG Energy Upgrade takes a `whole house´ approach to energy conservation; UK households identified in ten disadvantaged communities across Yorkshire and the Humber will benefit from a package of measures highly individual for each of the households and will ensure householders achieve the best energy efficiency performance through the measures. The initiative represents a big step forward in the way insulation and micro generation are integrated and will make a huge difference to deprived communities.

The project is being led by Kirklees Council and partners include six local authorities, four Arms Length Management Housing Organisations, two Registered Social Landlords across Yorkshire and the Humber, Yorkshire Energy Services along with University of Sheffield, who will monitor the performance of the installed measures; look at behavioural issues linked with energy consumption; support the supply chain associated with the programme and monitor energy consumption in some of the households.

The University of Sheffield´s Vice-Chancellor Professor Keith Burnett, said: “We´re delighted to be working in partnership with regional local authorities on this flagship project which we´re supporting through a multi-disciplinary team including architecture, supply-chain, digital technology, civil engineers and psychology. This allows understanding of the problem as a whole: the building, the new energy technologies, and importantly the human behaviour.

“The University´s strength of partnership with our region is rarely more important than in a project of this nature that is piloting solutions to the integrated challenges of carbon emissions, economic growth, and fuel poverty.”

Professor Lenny Koh, Director of the Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability and Associate Dean at the University of Sheffield’s Management School, is the Principle Investigator of The Big Energy Upgrade project said: “This project brings together the University’s cross cutting team from energy and environment, using a truly multi-disciplinary approach to tackle these important energy challenges in society. We look forward to working closely with the local authorities and other partners in pioneering this low carbon direction.”

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Big energy upgrade partners

The project will run until March 2014 and will act as a catalyst in attracting further funding towards energy efficiency projects, which in turn will create more demand for materials and skills in the area of retrofitting and micro generation. As well as creating 114 new jobs, it will also help to prepare the region, in terms of knowledge and experience, for the delivery of a new area-based `whole house` approach to be delivered as part of the Government´s Green Deal post 2012.

To read the full media release see:

For further information and coverage of this story see:

£14.9m awarded for pioneering low carbon programme in Yorkshire and the Humber

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2011

Disadvantaged communities across Yorkshire and the Humber are set to benefit from a ground-breaking new project, which, for the first time ever, will see low carbon measures installed throughout whole houses.

The Big Energy Upgrade will see the University of Sheffield work alongside partners to monitor the performance of the installed measures, look at behavioural issues linked with energy consumption, support the supply chain associated with the project and monitor energy consumption in selected households.

Officially called the Energy Innovation for Deprived Communities, the programme is being delivered by a partnership of organisations throughout Yorkshire and the Humber. A total fund of £14.9m has been made available, of which £7m is being part-financed through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) as part of Europe´s support for the region´s economic development through the Yorkshire and Humber ERDF Programme.

Principle Investigator (PI) of The Big Energy Upgrade project, Professor Lenny Koh, Director of the Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (CEES) and Associate Dean at the University of Sheffield´s Management School, said: “This project brings together the University´s cross cutting team from energy and environment, using a truly multi-disciplinary approach to tackle these important energy challenges in society. We look forward to working closely with the local authorities and other partners in pioneering this low carbon direction.”

The project will run until March 2014 and will act as a catalyst in attracting further funding towards energy efficiency projects, which in turn will create more demand for materials and skills in the area of retrofitting and micro generation. It will also help to prepare the region, in terms of knowledge and experience, for the delivery of a new area-based whole house approach to be delivered as part of the Government´s Green Deal post 2012.

To read read the full news release see: http://www.shef.ac.uk/mediacentre/2011/carbon-project-energy-upgrade.html

Our Students Win Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards

Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

Management School is delighted to report that two of our recent successful PhD students have received recognition in the “2010 Emerald/EFMD Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards”

Steven Kennedy who was supervised by Linda Lewis and Frank Birkin was highly commended in the “Management and Governance” category for his submission on “Using a Stakeholder Thinking Approach to Investigate Barriers to the Implementation of Sustainable Development”

Anna Scott who was supervised by Caroline Oates was highly commended in the “Marketing Research” category for her submission on “Towards sustainable consumption: Understanding the adoption and practice of environmental actions in households”

Further details of the awards and categories may be found at: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/research/awards/odra.htm

Congratulations to Steven and to Anna and to the supervisors of their research
on these awards.

Management School Contributes to University Success in Winning a Doctoral Training Centre in Energy

Wednesday, December 10th, 2008

The Faculty of Engineering has been successful in being awarded £6.3 million for a Doctoral Training Centre in Energy:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/research/cdts/stier.html

The Management School’s Phil Wright and Lenny Koh contributed to this successful interdisciplinary bid and the School will therefore be funded to develop and provide teaching to students to ensure a better understanding of the interplay between economics, policy and the provision of a sustainable energy supply. Of the 100 PhD students the Centre will train, some may choose to deepen their understanding of the economics of energy supply and demand by pursuing a PhD in the School.

Visit by Professor Jacques Percebois to the Management School

Friday, July 18th, 2008

The visit by the University of Montpellier’s Jacques Percebois to the School and the University created considerable interest. His University-wide lecture on nuclear industry policy, held in the Department of Engineering Materials on Tuesday, July 15th, attracted over 50 people including outside participation by interested companies and Yorkshire Forward. A further 20 people from around the University attended his more specialised seminar on the International Gas Market, held in the Management School on Thursday, July 17th. Professor Percebois also discussed common research interests with Professor Wright, instigated a new collaborative venture in the area of Doctoral training and made himself available for discussions with PhD students.

Details of the seminar and lecture follow, plus biographical details for Professor Percebois.

Management School seminar: “The International Gas Market and the Liberalisation Process”

Continental European gas markets, or the lack of them, are frequently blamed by the UK government for contributing to the rapid increase in gas prices which we are currently experiencing. In this seminar Professor Jacques Percebois will show how the continental European gas market is organised, both in terms of where gas supplies are obtained from and how they are contracted for and priced. The companies involved (both importers and exporters) and their strategies will be examined, exposing the issues which they pose for regulators.

The University seminar: “The role of nuclear energy in Europe and the reprocessing-recycling policy of nuclear waste in France”

Following a survey of the role of nuclear power in European primary energy balances and in electricity generation, Professor Percebois will discuss the main foundations of French energy policy and the role played in it by nuclear power. The principal focus of the seminar will be on the long-term management of nuclear wastes in France: the French legal framework, the volumes of waste involved, the technology and the prospective costs. The policy decisions which are pending about about reprocessing and storage will also be discussed.

Professor Jacques Percebois:

Professor Jacques Percebois is the Director of CREDEN (Centre for Research in Energy Economics & Law) at the University of Montpellier(1) where he was formerly a long-serving Dean of the Faculty of Economics. He is France’s most distinguished energy economist whose status was internationally recognised last year when he received the International Association for Energy Economics’ Outstanding Contribution Award at its annual conference in Florence. He has contributed to numerous French government enquiries and currently sits on the National Commission for the Evaluation of Research into the Management of Nuclear Materials and Nuclear Waste. He is a member of the board of Gaz de France Transport.

Phil Wright answers the question: Have We Got the Energy?

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2008

On the evening of Tuesday, April 15th, Professor Philip Wright tried to answer this question at a well-attended public lecture to the Yorkshire Philosophical Society held in the Tempest Anderson Hall in York. He was invited to address the Society as part of its series of lectures on Controversy and Risk and he demonstrated that the UK appears to have three looming energy problems: the prospect of very substantial import requirements for both oil and gas; the implications which this has for the country’s balance of payments and considerable uncertainty about the adequacy and cost of our future electricity supplies. As he also told BBC Radio York in an interview before the lecture, neither nuclear power nor generation using renewables can address the electricity problem within the next eight years. However, there is considerable scope to make the inevitable continuing dependence on fossil fuels more sustainable by tackling the demand for fuels, particularly where it has been growing most rapidly: within the home, air transport and road freight. He also pointed out that the only effective climate change policy which the country has had in recent years has not been fashioned by the government but rather by the replacement of coal and oil consumption with gas (which has lower CO2 emissions) and by the decline in manufacturing industry.

About the YPS

Yorkshire Philosophical Society was formed in 1822 to pursue the study of natural sciences. The British Association for the Advancement of Science was founded with the help of the Society and had its inaugural meeting at the Yorkshire Museum in 1831.

A slide from the Lecture
Download the Presentation [pdf] [1.44MB]