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Recycling e-waste worth up to 3.7 billion euros to Europe

Monday, August 17th, 2015

Lenny Koh

Recycling waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) more effectively could be worth up to 3.7 billion euros to the European market as well as reducing environmental pollution, an award winning research paper has found.

Professor Lenny Koh from the Management School along with colleagues Federica Cucciella, Idiano D’Adomo and Paolo Rosa from the University of L’Aquila and Politecnico di Milano have recently published a paper entitled ‘Recycling of WEEEs: an economic assessment of present and future e-waste streams’.

Waste electrical and electronic equipment is currently considered to be one of the fastest growing waste streams in the world, with an estimated growth rate between three and five per cent each year.

Professor Koh, Director of Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC) and a world leading expert on low carbon supply chains, said: “We have been working on the collaborative research for several years with the University of L’Aquila and Politecnico di Milano. This builds from our prior research on turning waste into resource, resource efficiency and circular economy.

“In particular, this research has strong relevance to addressing global issues of materials availability and security, reducing reliance on unused non-renewable materials, especially precious, critical and rare earth materials in manufacturing for sustainability and for consideration for substitution.”

The paper presents a comprehensive framework supporting the decision-making process of multiple electronic recycling centres. The assessment defined the potential revenues coming from the recovery of valuable materials, such as gold and platinum, in 14 electronic items including notebooks, monitors, smartphones, hard drives and tablets using current and future disposed quantities in Europe.

It found that recycling electronic waste was equal to 2.15 billion euros in overall potential revenue to the European market in 2014 and could rise to 3.67 billion euros by 2020. As well as providing a significant source of revenue, more effective recovery of materials could benefit the environment by reducing manufacturers’ reliance on unprocessed resources.

Professor Koh added: “The recycling of e-waste could allow the diminishing use of virgin resources in manufacturing and, consequently, it could contribute in reducing environmental pollution.

“Given that EU has tried over the last two decades to develop a circular economy based on the exploitation of resources recovered by wastes, this research is key evidence to influence both industry and government on the financial and economic value of materials recovery of WEEE.”

With the development of new electronic items and waste set to increase, the research highlights the need for manufacturers and recycling centres to work more closely together in order to recover more material from disposed equipment. It also recommends needed the development of more flexible recycling plants able to intercept different types of end of life products.

Following publication earlier this month, the research has been recognised by academic publisher Elsevier with the prestigious Atlas Award.

The award recognises scientific research that has an impact on people around the world and is selected by an advisory board based on suggestions from the publishers of Elsevier’s 1,800 journals each month.

Professor Gill Valentine, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for the Faculty of Social Sciences, said: “I am delighted to hear that Professor Koh and her colleagues have been recognised with the Elsevier Atlas Award. This insightful work demonstrates the significant impact research here at the University can have on our world and the environment.”

An award ceremony for the presentation of the Elsevier Atlas Award will be announced soon.

Supporting supply chain resource sustainability

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Fifty-one industry representatives and academics explored supply chain challenges during a half-day workshop held at the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre to foster closer working relationships between University of Sheffield academics and leading businesses in key strategic areas including advanced materials and manufacturing, energy and nuclear, water and agritech/food.

Professor Lenny Koh, supported by a distinguished team of respected academics, led the Supply Chain Resource Sustainability (SCRS) workshop, helping to shape the vision and programme of supply chain resource sustainability research for translational and high impact performance. The workshop was very well attended, resulted in an informed and diverse range of opinions and identified key collaborative areas, capabilities and tools around supply chain resource sustainability needed by industry to address their resources supply chain challenges.

The workshop also introduced the Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC), a facility for supporting the development of competitive advantage by creating world leading, resource sustainable supply chains through collaborative action between industry and academia, especially in the thematic areas where the University of Sheffield has deep expertise including advanced materials and manufacturing; energy and nuclear; water; and agritech/food.

The three key challenges/priorities in each of these sectors are summarised below. A report will be released in mid September 2014, to be followed by a collaborative steering group meeting.

International links for LSCM’s Dr Genovese

Monday, June 30th, 2014

ISOLDE (International Symposium On Locational DEcisions) is a prestigious triennial conference which gathers researchers and practitioners from all over the world, aiming at integrating different approaches to deal with locational decisions.

This year’s ISOLDE was organised by Sheffield University Management School academic Dr Andrea Genovese, along with the conference chair Professor Giuseppe Bruno (from University of Naples “Federico II”, Italy), Dr Carmela Piccolo (from the same institution) and Dr Maria Barbati (from University of Portsmouth), pictured below.

Isolde Genovese

2014’s ISOLDE was held in Italy and, sticking with tradition, the scientific programme took place across two different locations. This year, it was the turn of Naples and of the island of Capri.

More than 100 experts from operational research, mathematics, management science, geography, economics and engineering disciplines, among others, have presented their more recent advances in modelling, theory and applications, with contributions dealing with logistics, manufacturing, transportation and telecommunication industries.  Several special issues will be linked to the conference.
Isolde delegates

LSCM research on local airport reaches new heights

Friday, January 31st, 2014

UniversityAirportStudy

Dr Niraj Kumar and Dr Andrea Genovese have been featured extensively in the local press, regarding their research  on Robin Hood Airport (RHA).

The academic due, from the Logistics and Supply Chain Management division of Sheffield University Management School, discussed a number of subjects related to the airport in the context of their research – primarily observing that the opportunity to add new destinations to RHA’s is there and, should they do so, the airport would be used more extensively by the local population.

Economic migration, perception of the airport, business links and its freight/distribution opportunities were also discussed in the extensive piece, which you can view by clicking on the image on this article, or following the links below.

http://www.thestar.co.uk/news/business/90-would-use-airport-if-more-destinations-were-offered-1-6403074

http://www.thestar.co.uk/news/business/more-strings-to-robin-hood-airport-s-bow-1-6403070

Environmental and Energy Improvements – European funded collaborative project is thinking big for SMEs

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

MS017

Key international stakeholders in a University of Sheffield managed team met in January 2014 and kick-started a ground-breaking new project which aims to help Small to Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs) deliver both environmental and cost improvements.The European consortium’s initial talks laid foundations for the implementation of a project, EU LLP PrESS (SCEnAT). SCEnAT (Supply Chain Environmental Analysis Tool) has been developed by Professor Lenny Koh, project Principal Investigator and Leader of the Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (CEES) at Sheffield University Management School.

This project will further develop Professor Koh’s SCEnAT tool, which already helps SMEs understand their environmental impact, so that it can deliver carbon emission reductions and real cost reductions.

The consortium comprises four academic members, the University of Sheffield, the University of Lodz (Poland), the University of Naples “Federico II” (Italy) and the South East European Research Centre (SEERC – Greece), working in partnership with four private sector trade organisations from their respective regions. The University of Sheffield’s partner is Sheffield Chamber of Commerce and Industry (SCCI). The collaborative project’s objective is to help SMEs improve their environmental footprint and drive commercial benefits in this internationally competitive world.

Professor Lenny Koh, who is also Associate Dean for Alumni at Sheffield University Management School, said: “We believe that CEES has developed an excellent and simple tool [SCEnAT] which any SME can use to understand its carbon footprint. However, we recognise that most businesses will require help in not only implementing the tool, but also carrying out the beneficial projects that it will identify.

“The European funding gives us a great opportunity to work with three partner universities across Europe to assess SCEnAT’s wider applicability, and to commercialise the tool, making it a real benefit to businesses.”

Richard Wright, Executive Director of Sheffield Chamber of Commerce, added: “SMEs represent the backbone of our economy. We need them to grow and be sustainable economically and environmentally if we are going to deliver a successful future.

“However, it is probably more difficult for SMEs to evaluate the options and implement improvements because they have finite resources, and environmental skills are not always a core capability. For instance, rising energy costs are putting significant strains on many businesses – but the time and skills required to optimise the unit cost do not usually reside within the organisation. SCEnAT and its forthcoming development are designed to tackle that issue.”

For more information on the project go to www.sheffield.ac.uk/scenat-press

This project is funded with the support of the Lifelong Learning Programme of the European Union. This press release reflects on the author’s view and the Agency and Commission are not responsible for any use that made be made of the information it contains.

Call for Papers: Doctoral Student Conference on ‘Sustainable Operations, Logistics and Supply Chain Management’

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

AndreaNiraj

Leaders of the conference, Dr Andrea Genovese and Dr Niraj Kumar (pictured left), aim to bring together young researchers (mainly doctoral students and early career researchers) to present their research works in a constructive environment and to facilitate and exchange research ideas, and receive constructive feedback on their work. The conference provides the ideal opportunity to network with your peers from other management and business schools in UK. The conference is sponsored by the Society for the Advancement of Management Studies (SAMS), and no fee will be charged for registration and attendance.The theme is ‘Sustainable Operations, Logistics and Supply Chain Management’, reflecting the key challenges for future in manufacturing and service sector. Papers on all topics related to the theme are invited, however preference will be given to the following topics:

  • Resource-efficient production
  • Sustainable design of production networks
  • Green and lean production and supply chains
  • Business models for sustainable operations
  • Information systems for sustainable supply chain
  • Supply chain environmental impacts measurement
  • Performance measures, metrics, and impact of sustainable businesses
  • Design of resource-efficient logistics networks
  • Socially responsible logistics and supply chains
  • Reverse logistics
  • Reference models for green production and supply chains
  • Sustainability issues in manufacturing and services sector
  • Strategies and decision making for resource efficient production and supply chains

The conference is intended as a forum for presenting innovative and transformational ideas in the field; submissions addressing contemporary and future practical challenges in the transition towards sustainable and resource-efficient operations are strongly encouraged.

Presenting at the conference is not mandatory, however it is highly encouraged, especially for students who may have little previous experience or who wish to present in a relaxed environment among peers.

Important Dates

Registration opening: 1 February 2014
Submission of extended abstract deadline: 28 February 2014
Notification of Acceptance: 14 March 2014
Submission of Full paper: 1 May 2014
Registration deadline: 10 May 2014
Conference: 5 June 2014

Instruction for contributors

  • An extended abstract (maximum 1,000 words) should be submitted by email to the organising team (contact details below) before the deadline – 28 February 2014
  • Abstracts will undergo blind review process and author(s) will be informed about the decision
  • Author(s) of the accepted abstract will be invited to submit the full paper (no more than ten pages) on their work. Full papers are accepted on the assumption that they are the original work of the authors, and previously not published
  •  Author(s) of the accepted papers (at least one person) must register, attend the conference and present the paper. For registering, authors can send an email with their details (Name, Affiliation and email address) to the organising team (contact details below)
  • The ‘Best Paper’ awards will be announced at the end of the conference

Organising team:

Dr Andrea Genovese, Lecturer in Logistics and Supply Chain Management
Phone: +44 (0) 114 222 3347
E-mail: a.genovese@sheffield.ac.uk

Dr Niraj Kumar, Lecturer in Operations and Supply Chain Management
Phone: +44 (0) 114 222 3360
E-mail: n.kumar@sheffield.ac.uk

Logistics and Supply Chain Management Research (LSCM) Centre
Sheffield University Management School, The University of Sheffield, Conduit Road, Sheffield S10 1FL, UK

 

Making links: Logistics and Supply Chain Management in India

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

Dr Andrea GenoveseIndia can learn from our mistakes, suggests Dr Andrea Genovese from Sheffield University Management School.

On a recent visit to a workshop concerning the NEX-GIFT project, Dr Genovese, pictured right, was keen to speak to practitioners, journalists and fellow international academics about India’s fortunate position in the improvement and diversification of India’s freight logistics.

Speaking to trade publication TransREporter, Dr Genovese, who is a lecturer on Sheffield University Management School’s MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management, said: “The real objective of the project [NEX-GIFT] is to establish a forum where both practitioners and academics and introduce best practices in next generation logistics transportation for freight. One of the limitations people always point out when it comes to academic research is that there is a difference between what we work on, and the real world. So this project tries to bridge that gap.

“We want to promote use of greener transportation. Road transport is the most polluting mode of transport because, especially in India, the fleet in terms of vehicles that are used to move things around is not very green. So, moving to railways and waterways can cut the cost of fuel consumption and lessen CO2 emissions too. Furthermore, promoting mitigation measures (like shipment consolidation, adoption of greener vehicles and more efficient driving styles) can also reduce the impact of road freight transport.”

Sheffield University Management School nurtures its close relations with industry and Dr Genovese’s course, which is run by programme director and leader of the NEX-GIFT project Dr Alok Choudhary, benefits from especially close links. Each student undertakes a company project working on a real-life problem within industry and field-visits to relevant sites and exhibitions in England are also a significant element of the Msc Logistics and Supply Chain Management.

The NEX-GIFT project’s intention to bring together academic theory and logistics practitioners to find a model for best practice is unique in its approach – it has led to a great deal of international collaboration and two more workshops are planned in the USA and at Sheffield University Management School.

Working directly with Indian partners on the project has led to Dr Genovese’s assertion that India can learn from Western mistakes. He said: “India is still considered to be a developing country. What this means to me is that you still have the possibility of doing things better than we in the Western economy have done. So, India can learn from our mistakes (for example, the massive shift from railways to freight that there has been in the UK in the last 50 years) and we can learn about logistics approaches being developed in India.”

On being asked why the University of Sheffield wanted India to be part of the NEX-GIFT study, Dr Genovese said: “India’s economy is one of the biggest in the world and it is a country where the internal demand for goods is expected to rise in the next three years. And there is an emerging middle class that will request more goods, given the economic growth India is experiencing. This will cause an increase in the need for more logistics activities.”

Dr Genovese has also identified a large gap in logistics and supply chain management education in India, despite it being a prominent area of growth. Our collaborations with the Indian Institute of Technology (ITT) Delhi and two universities in the USA have proved very fruitful, but it is important that with government support, more young Indians consider logistics as a career option.

Following the successful Sustainable Next Generation Freight Transportation Workshop, which was hosted at ITT Delhi, Dr Genovese and the Sheffield team are moving the project forward. The next step includes establishing a collaborative online platform which shares success stories from different companies; it will focus on the main industry-academia collaborative opportunities and the role which government can play.

Read more about Sheffield University Management School’s MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management on our website: www.sheffield.ac.uk/management/msc/lscm

 

Read more about this story on the related article on Maritime Gateway and TransREporter, two prominent Indian publications for Logistics practitioners:

Nov13 pg1-2  Nov13 pg3

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Click above files for a larger view

Demonstration of SCEnAT on cloud the Supply Chain Environmental Analysis Tool

Thursday, March 14th, 2013

The advancement in cloud services now offers Universities and research groups access to an unparalleled level of technological power. The University of Sheffield will play host to this event to demonstrate the Supply Chain Environmental Analysis Tool (SCEnAT), an innovative application powered by Windows Azure. The event will also celebrate the launch of the Microsoft and Janet document pack.

Professor Lenny Koh Director of The University of Sheffield Logistics and Supply Chain Management (LSCM) Research Centre will speak about SCEnAT and its benefits to users. Carlos Oliveira, Managing Director of Shaping Cloud will discuss the development of the tool and benefits of utilising the technology. Mark McManus, Cloud Services Business Manager at Microsoft will talk about the Windows Azure platform and discuss the benefits to Universities and research groups. Tony Lewis of Janet will conclude the event by discussing the exclusive contractual amendments and due diligence available to research and education institutions in the form of the Janet Cloud Services for Education Agreement.

The advanced cloud technology used to build the tool has been recognised by Microsoft who have featured a case study about the tool on their own website.

This event is being supported by the University of Sheffield, Microsoft, Janet and Shaping Cloud.

To register:

To register your place and for more information visit:  http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/lscm/scenat

Energy we can all afford: public meeting and ‘Question Time’

Monday, March 4th, 2013

This winter millions of people across the UK have been struggling to pay their gas and electricity bills, yet energy prices continue to rise. How can we tackle the challenges of fuel poverty, fossil fuels and climate change to create energy we can all afford, warmer homes, lower bills and a cooler planet?

Come and join the debate

Date:  Friday 8 March
Time:  7.30pm start and refreshments from 7pm
Venue:  The Church View Centre, Church View, Doncaster, DN1 1AF (Parking available at rear of entrance, on street and market car park free after 6pm)

Speakers include:

Caroline Flint, State of Energy and Climate Change & MP for Don Valley
Martyn Williams, Energy Bill Revolution
Prof. Lenny Koh, Centre for Energy, Environment & Sustainability at University of Sheffield
Simon Bowens, Friends of the Earth Yorkshire & the Humber

For further information:
Contact Rachel at rachel.hubbard@foe.co.uk  or Tel: 07917 358796.

Organised by Doncaster Friends of the Earth with thanks to Doncaster CDT www.foe.co.uk/doncaster  and www.doncastercdt.org

Independent investigation reveals communities’ thoughts on Government’s Green Deal

Monday, March 4th, 2013

Implications and challenges surrounding the Governments energy-efficiency flagship programme the Green Deal have been raised by University of Sheffield researchers following an investigation into what low income communities in the Yorkshire and Humberside region think of the scheme.

Insulation in a home ©iStockphoto.com/LianeM

Experts from the University of Sheffield, as part of wider research into the BIG Energy Upgrade Programme, held focus groups in six towns and cities across the region to assess initial awareness of the Green Deal by residents in deprived communities.

The Green Deal is one of the flagship policies of the current Coalition Government stimulating economic growth and aiming for carbon emissions reduction, fuel poverty reduction and improved homes.

Initial costs of any improvements are paid for by residents who take out a loan from the Green Deal Finance Company then pay it off through savings to their fuel bills.

The researchers interviewed residents in Leeds, Barnsley, Doncaster, Scunthorpe, Dewsbury and Grimsby in community centres, church halls and cafes.

Although more findings are expected following a thorough analysis of their data, the researchers were able to draw out some feedback including:

  • Many residents who do not own their own homes perceive a financial investment in someone else’s property as unfair and illogical.
  • The Green Deal is good for the local supply chains and the economy.
  • Residents are dubious of the role that banks might play in financing the Green Deal.
  • It will boost the energy efficiency market and creates a low carbon future for our building stocks.
  • Confusion between the Green Deal and other Government initiatives, such as solar panels and the feed-in tariff
  • Residents concluded that it is only a matter of time before their Local Authority or Housing Association will fund interventions across all homes under one scheme or another
  • While the financial savings may be significant in time, increased warmth and comfort are immediate and tangible.

Professor Lenny Koh, who led the project, said: “Green Deal is a strategic and important financial scheme to help people to keep their home warm and afford access to energy. Hence, Green Deal will improve quality of life of individuals.

“It is important that the housing stock is made more energy-efficient and the Green Deal is the right scheme to do that. It has a customised element for the assessment and installation process which makes it tailored to the needs of the user.

“People are dealing with Green Deal approved companies so should get an expected high standard of work. It is also sustainable and should only be implemented when it will definitely benefit residents.”

This work was undertaken as part of the BIG Energy Upgrade Programme, a project part financed by the European Union through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) for the Yorkshire and Humber Programme 2007 – 2013 and utilised additional funding from the University of Sheffield.

For more information on the Big Energy Upgrade please visit: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/bigenergyupgrade